Bitcoin Mining Software - Bitcoin Miner - I mine for ...

SOLO Mining setup instructions. CCminer Nevermore and QT / CLI wallet.

First, I do not solo mine myself, so I can not confirm if this setup pays. I do not have the hash to even consider trying. I can confirm ccminer gets work from the wallet and cards get hot. Enjoy!
 
EDIT: Setup tested on coin with lower difficulty. I got paid.
 
 
 
rpcuser=user rpcpassword=pass rpcbind=192.168.1.100:8766 rpcallowip=192.168.1.1/24 server=1 
 
Replace user, pass and ips to match your setup. You can make up your own usepass. You need to use the same ones when configuring ccminer. 192.168.1.100 needs to be changed to the IP of the machine running the wallet. This setup allows connections from all ips in the range 192.168.1.X
 
 
:mine ccminer.exe -a x16r -o http://192.168.1.100:8766 -u user -p pass -i 21 --no-longpoll --no-getwork --no-stratum --coinbase-addr=YOUR_RVN_ADDRESS_HERE ping -n 30 127.0.0.1 goto :mine 
 
Replace user, pass and IP to match your setup. The IP is to the machine running the wallet and the usepass are the ones you set in the first config file. And don't forget to add your RVN-address.
 
 
If you found this useful any donation would be welcome RVN: RFmtFb9GdZHvbvBW5hYB3s9VezJxeSfnz3  
   
 
#!/bin/bash until /path/to/ccminer -a x16r -o http://192.168.1.100:8766 -u user -p pass -i 21 --no-longpoll --no-getwork --no-stratum --coinbase-addr=YOUR_RVN_ADDRESS_HERE; do ping -c 30 127.0.0.1 done 
 
Replace user, pass and IP to match your setup. The IP is to the machine running the wallet and the usepass are the ones you set in the first config file. And don't forget to add your RVN-address.
 
 
 
If you found this useful any donation would be welcome RVN: RFmtFb9GdZHvbvBW5hYB3s9VezJxeSfnz3
    
Found errors or got suggestions? - please leave a comment or send me a message.
 
Useful links:   https://github.com/brian112358/nevermore-minereleases https://github.com/brian112358/nevermore-minewiki/Solo-mining https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/118/how-much-bitcoin-will-i-mine-right-now-with-hardware-x https://rvnstats.info/
submitted by fdoving to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

bitcoin.conf for solo mining

I've done this a long time ago. It never was a problem. Nowadays I don't get it to work. Would be great to get some help:
My bitcoin.conf looks like this:
server=1 rpcuser=bomtom rpcpassword=secret rpcallowip=192.168.0.0/24 rpcport=8332 
If I point my miner to a pool via
./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://some.pool:8332 -u bomtom -p secret --api-listen --cs 9 --stmcu 0 -T --diff 12 
...it works just fine.
If I point my miner to my own bitcoind however via
./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://192.168.0.2:8332 -u bomtom -p secret --api-listen --cs 9 --stmcu 0 -T --diff 12 
...it doesn't work and just throws:
 [2018-01-01 04:14:10] Probing for an alive pool [2018-01-01 04:14:20] Waiting for work to be available from pools 
Is there anything wrong with my bitcoin.conf? My chain is up to date and bitcoind generally works.
submitted by bomtom1 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Setting up solo mining just targeting USB erupters? PC/Mac?

I am having trouble trying to get solo mining started on either my PC or Mac. I have a PC set up that is using three 7950s that are mining Litecoins. I'd like to have my 2 USB erupters solo mining Bitcoins for fun on the same system. I have the drivers installed for the USB miners and my system recognizes them.
I am starting Bitcoin-QT as -server
My bitcoin.conf looks like this: listen=1 server=1 rpcuser=user rpcpassword=pass
I set up a BFG .bat like this: bfgminer.exe -o 127.0.0.1:8332 -O -u user -p pass
When I launch that, BFG just crashes. I have also tried it with CGminer and that crashes also. I'd like to keep CGminer on the cards Litecoin mining and use BFG for the USB miners.
How do I get BFG to work just with the USBs? Also, do I need to input a Bitcoin address somewhere so if I did solve something I get the payout?
Sometimes, I do more work on my Mac and am also trying to set up the USBs to mine on a Mac using Diablo miner. Will that work the same way as the PC setup once we get it figured out?
Thanks for any help.
submitted by PoisonCoyote to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[P2pool] How to make your own personal p2pool Node!

Tired of getting no block rewards and sending many dead shares? Need a p2pool node close to your miner? MAKE YOUR OWN! :D
And, Yep, P2pools give 0.5% Rewards to block finders!
Here's some info about p2ools: http://whatisp2pool.com/
The stronger the P2Pool network becomes the more resistant the digibyte network is to 51% attacks!
Oh and, P2pools are DDOS proof! Now that's News! So if your node gets DDOS'd .. you dont lose your shares as the shares have been saved in the p2pool, its called the sharechain. So you get paid anyhow! Thanks to the p2pool network. and you ccan set your workers to another pool using the "--failover only" command in cgminer (if im not wrong) and get it back to work on the p2pool network!
TL;DR; P2POOL = 1 Big fat network Decentrazlized pool!
STEPS TO MAKE A P2POOL:
Install Ubuntu server or Desktop if you want http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ or u can use a VPS (VirtualPrivateServer -- Link Below with coupon code)
So Let's start off in the command line (Open Terminal.. and all you have to do is Cut, Copy Paste! ;) )
Start by updating and upgrading Ubuntu, you know you want the best ;)
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install python-software-properties sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update 
Time for the DigiByteProject dependencies!
sudo apt-get install build-essential libboost-all-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev libdb5.1-dev libdb5.1++-dev git qt-sdk libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install qrencode libqrencode-dev 
And, Now to compile DigiByte on your system!
git clone git://github.com/digibyte/DigiByteProject.git digibyte #renaming makes it easier ;) cd ~/digibyte/src mkdir obj make -f makefile.unix USE_UPNP=- sudo cp digibyted /usbin cd ~ 
After it has compiled try running 'digibyted'
./digibyte/src/digibyted 
If you get an error saying you need to make the digibyte.conf file, good! :) If it doesnt give you that error, make sure you followed the compiling steps appropriately.
So, Lets create the conf file here...
cd .digibyte #edited from 'digibyted' .. fixed!! nano digibyte.conf 
Paste the following, CHANGING THE USERNAME AND PASS!! make sure to take note of both, you'll need these later!
rpcuser=CHANGEusername rpcpassword=ChangePassword daemon=1 server=1 rpcport=14022 port=12024 gen=1 rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 addnode=74.208.230.160 addnode=31.220.25.91 addnode=184.155.218.183 addnode=24.119.23.61 addnode=70.196.193.231 addnode=198.98.118.241 addnode=142.4.204.115 addnode=23.90.191.58 addnode=216.250.125.121 addnode=115.28.31.25 addnode=83.172.105.46 
Press 'CTRL' + ' X', and then 'Y' to save when prompted
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
Make sure you check the latest block in the block chain or on your local DigiByte Wallets. This is to see how far your p2pool node has gotten! This is gonna take quite a while so lets CONTINUE!
Let's get the p2pool software and frontend in! Install the p2pool dependencies!
sudo apt-get install python-zope.interface python-twisted python-twisted-web git clone https://github.com/Rav3nPL/p2pool-rav p2pool #renaming it! cd ~/p2pool/digibyte_subsidy #Thanks to Chaeplin sudo python setup.py install 
Time to edit and customise the html code to personalise your p2pool's frontend. Feel free to change the p2pool name and if you're an advanced user, feel free to add your own frontend from git hub after removing the web-static folder. (OPTIONAL: by using rm -f -r web-static #in that directory. And then you can choose whichever frontend you want! by cloning it in the web-static folder)
Editing the current frontend html!
cd .. cd web-static nano index.html 
After personalising the page, i.e. changing the p2pool name and adding some info! Lets go back and check how far the block downloading has gotten! You can check this by typing this in the command line after going back to the root directory:
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
This is gonna take a while so might as well check for updates again :P
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade 
After making sure that all the blocks have been synced locally! We're ready to run the p2pool node! Simply enter the string below in the command line, entering your USERNAME and PASS that you saved earlier!
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 
If you want to charge a fee for your node add this to your string, adding your fee address!:
--fee 1.0 --address NEWDGBADDRESS 
To see if the node is up and running enter this in the command line:
screen -x myp2pool 
'CTRL' + 'A' + 'D' to close the terminal if you press 'CTRL' + 'C', it will terminate the p2pool program and you'll have to restart the pool by using the string above!
Once, Everything is setup as planned! Check your p2pool node's ip Address by entering this into the command line:
ifconfig 
inet addr: 192.168.1.1 #You'll see a line like this.
So, Your cgminer string should look something like this:
cgminer --scrypt -o 192.168.1.1:9022 -u DGBADDRESS -p x
And your p2pool WEB ADDRESS should look like this:
192.168.1.1:9022
example: http://192.168.1.1:9022/
You can monitor your p2pool using that web address! Enjoy, your personal p2pool node!! :D
If for whatever reason the server shuts off and you need to restart the p2pool node, you should run digibyted again and after it has synced successfully, just type in your p2pool string:
./digibyte/src/digibyted
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 --fee 1.0 --address NEWADDRESS
PRESS CTRL + A + D to Detach from screen
UPDATE Follow Guide below if you used this guide before DigibByte v2.0 was released (28th Feb 2014)
You must check whether you're on the right ShareChain. Make Sure the block Value says 7960!
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=408268.msg5440858#msg5440858
This Tutorial was made with the help of an existing Guide: http://doges.org/index.php?topic=5586.0 Kudos to crypto49er!
If you want to do this on a VPS:
Here's a link to a VPS hosting site:
https://www.digitalocean.com/
Feel free to use my $10 ref. code -- it doesnt really make a difference, though.
https://www.digitalocean.com/?refcode=dc909c442664
Let me know if this guide helped!
submitted by StormMiner to Digibyte [link] [comments]

Connection issues when starting a p2pool node

I can't get the p2pool to work
I'm using the custom 64 bit cudaminer miner from the sidebar
4 gpu, soon 5, msi 750 ti rig
bat file
cudaminer -o stratum+tcp://127.0.0.1:5899 -u VkzNU5CWF7JLqCHJPiietYGJpnFEC8A3GV -p x
miner
cudaminer-2014-02-18
version x86
The vertcoin wallet is updated and running
the p2pool was then activated in cmd
C:\xxx\xxx\xxtakenoutbymefornoparticularreasonxxx\Peer2pool\p2pool-n-master>C:\Python27\python.exe run_p2pool.py --net vertcoin
server=1 rpcpassword=xxxxtakenoutxxxx
Keep that password secret! After creating the file, restart Bitcoin.
vertcoin.conf file
server=1
gen=0
rpcport=5899
rpcallowip=127.0.0.1
rpcuser=xxx
rpcpassword=xxx
error message
[2014-05-07 09:48:31] Stratum connection failed: Failed connect to 127.0.0.1:589 9; No error [2014-05-07 09:48:31] ...retry after 15 seconds
wafflepool works flawlessly on the standard cudaminer, what now?
submitted by Sillopotatis to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Connection issues when I try to start a p2pool node

I can't get the p2pool to work
I'm using the custom 64 bit cudaminer miner from the sidebar
4 gpu, soon 5, msi 750 ti rig
bat file
cudaminer -o stratum+tcp://127.0.0.1:5899 -u VkzNU5CWF7JLqCHJPiietYGJpnFEC8A3GV -p x
miner
cudaminer-2014-02-18
version x86
The vertcoin wallet is updated and running
the p2pool was then activated in cmd
C:\xxx\xxx\xxtakenoutbymefornoparticularreasonxxx\Peer2pool\p2pool-n-master>C:\Python27\python.exe run_p2pool.py --net vertcoin
server=1 rpcpassword=xxxxtakenoutxxxx
Keep that password secret! After creating the file, restart Bitcoin.
vertcoin.conf file
server=1
gen=0
rpcport=5899
rpcallowip=127.0.0.1
rpcuser=xxx
rpcpassword=xxx
error message
[2014-05-07 09:48:31] Stratum connection failed: Failed connect to 127.0.0.1:589 9; No error [2014-05-07 09:48:31] ...retry after 15 seconds
wafflepool works flawlessly on the standard cudaminer, what now?
UPDATE:
Fixed the p2pool, it was a vetcoin.conf issue. I named the ending .conf.txt by misstake
Cudaminer works on simple vert! and p2pool!
I vent through a ton of visual studios variants, and "Visual studios 2012 professional" was the only one that worked for me!
Download link:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30682
Vertminer is still crashing just before it starts hashing
submitted by Sillopotatis to VertcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining setup on Mountain Lion throwing an error...

Hey all... I am getting an error when I attempt to start up bit coin on my Mountain Lion setup... Agamemnon:poclbm JP$ /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt.app/Contents/MacOS/bitcoin-qt -server & [1] 46626 Agamemnon:poclbm JP$ python /Applications/poclbm/poclbm.py -u XXXX --pass XXXX -d 0libc++abi.dylib: terminate called throwing an exception
Traceback (most recent call last): File "/Applications/poclbm/poclbm.py", line 3, in from BitcoinMiner import * File "/Applications/poclbm/BitcoinMiner.py", line 4, in from log import * ImportError: No module named log [1]+ Abort trap: 6 /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt.app/Contents/MacOS/bitcoin-qt -server
I have googled the above error with little success. Anyone else out there using mountain Lion? If this helps, I installed the latest bitcoin which is called bitcoin QT. The docs I have for mining setup dictate to edit the bit coin.conf file and add "echo "rpcuser=username" > ~/Library/Application\ Support/Bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo "rpcpassword=password" >> ~/Library/Application\ Support/Bitcoin/bitcoin.conf"
There was not a bit coin.conf file, so I created it and added the two requisite lines above.
Still get the error "abi.dylib: terminate called throwing an exception" and bit coin crashes.
Any help out there?
Thank you..
CW
submitted by Chowderwhore to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ANN]SHERLOCK COIN (SHC)| + | + 221 Baker St + | + |only 221 coins to be mined +

SHERLOCK COIN (SHC) - The Game is on to the Crypto World!
Overview As of Sherlock Holmes and as you may know is best detective and genius of all time , while being grateful for the dedication and works of Sir Arthur Canon Doyle , this coin is solely based on character of Sherlock Holmes and ingenuity of the same while solving mysteries the same can be seen on the coin. Wink , while dedicating this coin to all the enthusiasts of Sherlock Holmes , I believe and have faith that this coin will make it through and will be a success , something to hold on to and cherish.
As you probably know by now that the board get's spammed uncontrollably by ALT-Coins releases everyday , some might survive some might not I want SHC to be treasured not at all a pump and dump coin but a coin to cherish the name of Sherlock Holmes and for the enthusiasts to treasure it and if you want to spread it around.
Launch This is a fork of Litecoin and developed using foundations and guidance documented by beloved members here who have committed and pledged their support for cryptocurrencies mainly Bitcoin as well as Alt-coins , my salute is to all who strive to make Cryptocurrencies the future and the dedication of developers who work night and day to make that dream a success , this coin is not a competitor to Bitcoin nor other ALT coins but a strength to the world of Cryptocurrencies and my contribution thus stands and will always with the community , we should never forget the past , thus as they say if done will be void of a future , therefore my salute goes to Bitcoin , it's founders and developers and the community that stands by it and everyone on this forum , thereby paying my respect as we all know we should be thankful of Bitcoin without it we would never would have imagined or known about a world of Cryptocurrencies. Salute!
Please Note: This is NOT a paid up over the countewebsite coin , that just popped out of a script on a website after making a Bitcoin Payment , I had to put my sweat , tears , dedication , sacrifice and time (lot's of it) , had to put 200% of my effort, trial and error , learning , failures to make this workout , this coin opened up a new chapter in my life , learning , as I've learned alot while making this , I kindly ask you to respect that while criticizing if you may require.
BOUNTIES & GIVEAWAYS To Be Announced
WEBSITE http://www.sherlockcoin.org/ (Under Maintenance)
BLOCK EXPLORER To Be Announced
FORUM To Be Announced
SPECIFICATIONS Scrypt 221 coins Max 221 second block time Difficulty re-target every 10 minutes 0.00000010 Block reward for the first 221 blocks (Conveniently set to allow you to get your miners running) Blocks 222+ are 0.00004200 block reward Random Block Rewards/Super Blocks! Smiley Block 212 is a Special Block with More Rewards than the normal block value Tx fees are 0.00000001 RPC port 55883 p2p port 55884 0.01% (0.221 coins) Premine for Testing/Bounty and Giveaway Purposes.
DOWNLOADS
Source Code https://github.com/sherlockcoin/sherlockcoin
Windows Wallet https://www.mediafire.com/?ubm65t3099ba3hs
(https://www.virustotal.com/en/file/6d6df602b8090b105b2a0ccbb3a60a9111cace9dddc8354f8ffad855edfddd2e/analysis/1391839558/)
Sample sherlockcoin.conf file:
rpcuser=username rpcpassword=password rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 rpcport=55883 port=55884 listen=1 daemon=1 server=1 addnode=76.74.178.191
POOLS To be Announced
EXCHANGES To be Announced
SERVICES / OTHER To be Announced
REDDIT http://www.reddit.com/SherlockCoin/
IRC FreeNode To be Announced
For more services it's best to check out the website links at the top of this information thread.
Elementary my dear alt-coiner! Wink These coins will be rare! Smiley
submitted by soopy452000 to SherlockCoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

GUIDE: Coin launches and being prepared.

New CryptoCoin launch preperation guide;
I've created this short guide for new users who want to jump in on the mining of a newly launched coins. Being prepared and getting on the network immediately will lead to you finding the earliest blocks (some coins have block rewards that are higher in the beginning)
Step One - Prepare the Data/Wallet directory
The first step in this guide will be to setup the directory that will hold your wallet data, config file and blockchain store. We want to set this up first so we can immediately start solo mining without screwing around with settings that are common across all CryptoCoin wallets.
Windows 7/8; C:\Users\YOURUSERNAME\Appdata\Roaming\COIN_NAME
Windows XP; C:\Documents and Settings\YOURUSERNAME\Appdata\Roaming\COIN_NAME
Linux; ~/.coinname/
MacOS X - ~/Library/Application Support/
Create a directory in one of the above directories that will match the name of the coin (ie: Bitcoin). In this directory we are going to make the default .conf file;
Default options listed in the COINNAME.conf will be as follows;
server=1
listen=1
daemon=1
rpcuser=YOUR_DESIRED_USER_NAME
rpcpassword=YOUR_DESIRED_PASSWORD
rpcport=NUMERIC_PORT_TO_LISTEN_ON
rpcconnect=127.0.0.1
Change the rpcport parameter to a generic port # if you plan on only having one batch file to start solo mining. WARNING, this method will interfere with mining if multiple wallets are running using the same port number. If the launch forum post lists default rpcport #s, use them instead of one generic port. (cryptocointalk/bitcointalk).
Pay attention to the original launch information forum post, adding nodes with addnode=ipaddress, can help speed up node discovery and wallet sync. You can add these options fairly quickly with a cut and paste.
If you have multiple rigs and plan to throw their hashes at the wallet if it's not on the same machine, use the .conf option rpcallowip=your.network.address.* (eg: rpcallowip=192.168.0.*).
Step Two - Create your .bat file
If you've been mining for awhile, this should be a simple step, otherwise, it is beyond this tutorial on how to fine tune your mining software.
The .bat file should only be a few lines long;
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100 setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
cgminer --scrypt -o http://127.0.0.1:WALLET_RPCPORT_PARAM -u YOUR_USERNAME -p YOUR_PASSWORD the_rest_of_your_miner_config_here
This is the default for scrypt mining. Always pay attention to the announcement post for specific mining options (CPU only, keccek, scrypt-n, etc).
Change the IP address in -o option to your wallet machines ip address, should be you mining from a different machine. (making sure to set the above rpcallowip= correctly)
note: adding gen=1 to your config file will automatically start the wallets internal block generation routine, by passing the need to start your mining software. Just remember to edit this option later if you run the wallet continually and do no plan to directly mine.
Step Three - Mine!
Download and install/extract wallet, run the wallet. If everything is set correctly, you should be ahead of the game and finding blocks very quickly.
If you've found this post informative, I'm never opposed to receiving gifts of Litecoin :D LXFE81zFSTkzsV1TrRCtdy781F1aiEfYHe
also: If you have any additions to this guide, please PM or comment, so that I may correct any errors I may have included.
edit: formatting.
submitted by agentneuron to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How To Mine ULTRACOIN In A Pool how mining zcash SOLO MINE DIGIBYTE - Windows 10 / Graphics Card setting up bitcoin with GUI miner [updated] How to mine BnrtxCoin from the wallet (CPU)

To use Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below. To use the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below. To use both the GUI and the daemon, read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at ... miner-configuration. share improve this question follow edited Apr 9 '16 at 7:41. Murch ♦ 47k 30 30 gold badges 137 137 silver badges 409 409 bronze badges. asked Apr 23 '13 at 1:56. dacracot dacracot. 123 1 1 gold badge 1 1 silver badge 5 5 bronze badges. add a comment 2 Answers Active Oldest Votes. 2. Add a file named bitcoin.conf to your data directory with the following values ... Hey, It seems like I am infected with Riskware BitcoinMiner, please assist me with removing it from my system! Here are my Malwarebytes logs, aswell logs from Farbar Recovery Scan Tools! Addition.txt FRST.txt MalwarebytesLogs.txt Astonishing 1.3-1.7TH/s hashrate specification of a Bitcoin ASIC miner called the the SP20 Jackson which made by Spondoolies-Tech. The costs of the device is $110 and is available on eBay and Amazon.It also generates ~52 dB from 1 meter which is really at low speed and its nearest rival is the AntMiner S5 surpassing hashrate with a maximum of 1.7 TH/s. The software interface is user-friendly, it supports pool mining, there's a mode for power saving and very fast in share submission. The most powerful feature on this Bitcoin mining software is the profit reports. Hence, on this feature you can easily monitor your profit over a period of time. The newest version upon writing this article is Bitcoin Miner 1.27.0. BTCMiner. This Bitcoin miner is ...

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How To Mine ULTRACOIN In A Pool

This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue rpcuser=bnrtxcoin rpcpassword=bnrtxcoin addnode=54.194.99.126 addnode=bnrtx.noip.me daemon=1. Category People & Blogs; Show more Show less. Loading... Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a ... KnCMiner Jupiter - Bitcoin Miner 500GH/s+ 28nm ASIC chips - unboxing and setup 1080p - Duration: 4:18. Florian Uhlemann 130,974 views. 4:18. Language: English Location: United States ... This Pexa mining guide will show you how to get started mining this x16r mining algorythm from start to finish on your computers Nvidia and AMD gpu's. All the information you'll need is below ... We are going to show you how to mine ZCash testcoins on Ubuntu. To mine ZCash on Windows you may need to install Linux on a Virtual Machine. ===== htt...

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